Tancho Cranes

Hello everyone!
I hope everyone is enjoying their holiday seasons!
Today, I would like to introduce a little bit of information about Tancho Cranes that I have learned up in Hokkaido.  It was truly fascinating to hear about the historical backgrounds of these iconic birds of Japan so I thought it might be worth sharing. Kunihito Otonari, a member of the NPO “Tancho Community“, explained to us the conflicts that Tancho Cranes have faced through history and the problems that they are still facing today.

The cranes used to live in the mainlands of Japan and could be found in various places over the country. Japanese have long felt special bonds to these birds and the cranes have grown to be symbolic, partly because of how these birds nest in pairs and how easily they can be tamed, but also because of how the size of the red head signifies the tancho’s feelings. According to Otonari-san, the red part expands when the  cranes get excited or tense, which made it easier for humans to understand these birds and to relate to them. They have also been symbols of good luck, since Edo-period.
For this reason, only the Shogunate could hunt the cranes, and they were mainly hunted for eating, to drink their blood (there was a superstition that drinking tancho blood prolonged human life), or for being made into pets. However, after the Meiji Restoration, the commoners were given permission to hunt the cranes as well. This increased the population of crane hunters resulting in the endangerment of the Tancho Crane specie. By 1952, the numbers dropped to 33. Due to this extremely low number, artificial feeding of the cranes started from 1950, and up to this day, there are still feeders in Japan.
Currently they can only be found in eastern Hokkaido, and the number of cranes are slowly increasing. However, because the cranes have gotten used to being fed, they are only nesting in certain areas. This is causing the over-population of the cranes in small areas, where as a whole, the cranes are still listed as an endangered specie.

Knowing that Tancho Cranes have long had a social function in the Japanese society, we are hoping to look further into the history of these birds and how they have related to the people of Japan. So be ready for further information about Tancho Cranes that might be posted in the future!

Anyways, I hope you enjoyed reading about this red-headed creature aaaaaand…

I wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!!!!

tancho christmas


こんにちは!
みなさん休日をいかがお過ごしでしょうか。まだ休みに入っていないという方も多いかもしれません。
今回は、タンチョウヅルについて私が北海道で学んだことを少し紹介したいと思います。私たちは北海道でタンチョウコミュニティーというNPO法人の役人の一人である音成邦仁さんにお話を伺うことができました。日本のシンボルともいえるツルですが、その背景にある歴史的背景をご存知でしょうか。元旦の夢にタンチョウヅルが出てほしいと思っている方も、そうでない方も!ぜひこれを機にタンチョウと人との関わりについて学び、元旦に備えてください!(笑)

今でこそタンチョウヅルは北海道でしか見られない鳥として、知られていますが、その昔、日本本土にも生息していました。日本人がタンチョウに対して特別な思いを持ち始めたのは、最近の話ではなく、江戸時代、またはそれ以前にまでさかのぼるといいます。その理由としてよく挙げられるのは、人間同様つがいで行動する、というふうに言われいますが、それ以上にタンチョウが人に懐きやすい性質であることや、タンチョウの頭の赤い部分がその個体の感情を表現することによって人が親近感を持ちやすかったからと言われています。(タンチョウの頭部は興奮すると大きくなり、落ち着いていると小さくなります。)
また現代でも知られているように、幸運の印でもあります。その理由から、江戸時代には将軍家のみタンチョウ狩りが許可され、タンチョウは食べるため、血を飲むため(タンチョウの血を飲むと不老不死になるという言い伝えがあったため)、またペットとして飼うために狩られていました。しかし、明治維新を経て、タンチョウ狩りは将軍家以外の人々にも許可されます。急激に狩りをする人口が増えたため、タンチョウの数は激減しました。そしてその数は1952年には33羽にまで落ち込み、人為的な給餌が1950年に始まりました。数は減ってしまいましたが、この時給餌人として国に定められた人々は今でも北海道で給餌活動を行っています。

今では東北海道でしか見ることができないタンチョウですが、その数は徐々に戻りつつあると言います。しかしながら、毎年行われる給餌によってタンチョウは決まった場所にしか寄り付かなくなってしまいました。これにより、狭い範囲の中でのタンチョウの数の上昇によって様々な問題が起きています。また狭い国土で増えすぎてしまった一方で、全体の数としてはタンチョウヅルは未だに絶滅危惧種に分類されます。

このように、タンチョウと人々の深い関わりを学ぶ中で、私たちの研究グループはさらに詳しくタンチョウについて調べていきたいと思いました。これかも新たな発見をアップデートしていきたいと思いますので楽しみにしていてください!

それでは…

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!!
tancho christmas

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s